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Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Vitamin B3: Boosts Hydration to Reduce Redness

Vitamin B3: Find it in lotions, creams, and serums. It's often called niacinamide on the label.

Proven to increase production of ceramides and fatty acids, two key components of your skin's outer protective barrier. "As that barrier is strengthened, skin is better able to keep moisture in and irritants out -- making B3 a great ingredient if your complexion is dry or sensitive," says Leslie S. Baumann, MD, director of the University of Miami Cosmetic Medicine and Research Institute. In one study, a moisturizer with niacinamide improved the flushing and blushing of rosacea, a common condition that can worsen with age. Another B3 skin care benefit: It inhibits the transfer of pigment to skin cells, minimizing dark spots.

How to use For maximum results, apply B3 vitamins in the morning and evening. To reduce irritation from your retinoid, use it in conjunction with niacinamide. "Mix them together in the palm of your hand before applying--they won't inactivate each other," says Baumann. Besides decreasing side effects, the combo produces superior anti-aging benefits.

Try La Roche-Posay Rosaliac Anti-Redness Moisturizer ($30; CVS) or Olay Regenerist Micro-Sculpting Cream ($25; drugstores). 

 Please note:  Retina specialists at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) have shown that severe vision loss from a self-prescribed high dose of over-the-counter niacin is linked to injury of a specific cell type in a patient’s eye. The experts report that discontinuing the vitamin led to reversal of the condition and have published their findings in the fall issue of Journal of VitreoRetinal Diseases.